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Newly Identified Stem Cells May Hold Clues to Colon Cancer

Thursday, March 29th, 2012

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers have identified a new population of intestinal stem cells that may hold clues to the origin of colorectal cancer. This new stem cell population, reported March 30 in the journal Cell, appears to be relatively quiescent (inactive) – in contrast to the recent discovery of intestinal stem cells that multiply rapidly […]

iPOND Method Goes Fishing for Proteins

Friday, March 16th, 2012

Understanding DNA replication and DNA damage responses – which must proceed faithfully to prevent diseases such as cancer – requires the ability to monitor protein dynamics at active and damaged replication forks (sites of DNA duplication). Existing methods for studying replication fork machinery have been limited in resolution and sensitivity. Now, David Cortez, Ph.D., and […]

Studies Pinpoint New Anti-Cancer Drug Target

Friday, February 24th, 2012

A few years ago, Alison Hanson, Ph.D., a student in Vanderbilt’s Medical Scientist Training Program, was invited to have lunch with a visiting Nobel laureate, Aaron Ciechanover, M.D., D.Sc. Hanson was working on her dissertation research at the time, and she described some interesting findings to Ciechanover. “He said, ‘that could either be a total […]

Town Hall: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Monday, February 20th, 2012

We hope you will join us for a town hall meeting about non-small cell lung cancer on March 7 at 6:30 p.m. at the Millenium Maxwell House Hotel on Rosa Parks Blvd. This activity is intended for oncologists, pathologists, pulmonologists, and other clinicians involved in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The forum […]

Eating Fish May Lower Women’s Polyp Risk

Friday, February 10th, 2012

Women who eat at least three servings of fish per week have a reduced risk of developing some types of colon polyps, according to a new study by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center investigators. The research, led by first author Harvey Murff, M.D., MPH, associate professor of Medicine, was published recently in the American Journal of Clinical […]

Prostate Size May Help Predict Cancer Severity

Tuesday, January 31st, 2012

The size of a man’s prostate gland may help predict the severity of cancer, with a smaller prostate being more likely to harbor serious disease. This finding by a group of Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers was published in the December issue of the Journal of Urology. Fourth-year medical resident Judson Davies, M.D., was first author […]

Investigators Seek Clues to Resistance to Melanoma Drug

Friday, January 27th, 2012

Investigators at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and several other centers may be one step closer to finding out why some melanoma patients relapse after treatment with a promising new drug. Approximately half of all patients with the most deadly form of skin cancer have a mutation in the BRAF gene in their tumors that drives the […]

My Cancer Genome Wins Technology Award

Friday, January 13th, 2012

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center physician-scientists who created the new online medical decision support tool called “My Cancer Genome” have been named winners of a $20,000 health care technology award sponsored by the National Cancer Institute. The contest, “Using Public Data for Cancer Prevention and Control: From Innovation to Impact Developer Challenge,” was presented as part of […]

Cohen’s Nobel-Winning Work Stands Test of Time

Thursday, December 8th, 2011

Twenty-five years ago on Dec. 10, King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden presented the Nobel Prize to Vanderbilt biochemist Stanley Cohen, Ph.D., for his discovery and characterization of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor. At the time, the implications of Cohen’s discovery two decades earlier had barely begun to be realized. Today the EGF […]

Protein Family Linked to Suppressing Tumors

Friday, October 28th, 2011

The list of aging-associated proteins known to be involved in cancer is growing longer, according to research by investigators at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The new study, published Oct. 17 in Cancer Cell, identifies the protein SIRT2 as a tumor suppressor linked to gender-specific tumor development in mice. Along […]