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Eating Fish May Lower Women’s Polyp Risk

Friday, February 10th, 2012

Women who eat at least three servings of fish per week have a reduced risk of developing some types of colon polyps, according to a new study by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center investigators. The research, led by first author Harvey Murff, M.D., MPH, associate professor of Medicine, was published recently in the American Journal of Clinical […]

Prostate Size May Help Predict Cancer Severity

Tuesday, January 31st, 2012

The size of a man’s prostate gland may help predict the severity of cancer, with a smaller prostate being more likely to harbor serious disease. This finding by a group of Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center researchers was published in the December issue of the Journal of Urology. Fourth-year medical resident Judson Davies, M.D., was first author […]

Investigators Seek Clues to Resistance to Melanoma Drug

Friday, January 27th, 2012

Investigators at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and several other centers may be one step closer to finding out why some melanoma patients relapse after treatment with a promising new drug. Approximately half of all patients with the most deadly form of skin cancer have a mutation in the BRAF gene in their tumors that drives the […]

My Cancer Genome Wins Technology Award

Friday, January 13th, 2012

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center physician-scientists who created the new online medical decision support tool called “My Cancer Genome” have been named winners of a $20,000 health care technology award sponsored by the National Cancer Institute. The contest, “Using Public Data for Cancer Prevention and Control: From Innovation to Impact Developer Challenge,” was presented as part of […]

Cohen’s Nobel-Winning Work Stands Test of Time

Thursday, December 8th, 2011

Twenty-five years ago on Dec. 10, King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden presented the Nobel Prize to Vanderbilt biochemist Stanley Cohen, Ph.D., for his discovery and characterization of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor. At the time, the implications of Cohen’s discovery two decades earlier had barely begun to be realized. Today the EGF […]

Protein Family Linked to Suppressing Tumors

Friday, October 28th, 2011

The list of aging-associated proteins known to be involved in cancer is growing longer, according to research by investigators at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The new study, published Oct. 17 in Cancer Cell, identifies the protein SIRT2 as a tumor suppressor linked to gender-specific tumor development in mice. Along […]

Heart Protein May be Target for Colon Cancer Therapies

Friday, October 7th, 2011

A protein critical in heart development may also play a part in colon cancer progression. Research led by investigators fromVanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the Vanderbilt Eye Institute suggests that the protein BVES (blood vessel endocardial substance) – which also is key in regulating corneal cells – may be a therapeutic target for halting colon cancer metastasis. The study, […]

Hiebert’s Lymphoma Research Gains Support

Friday, August 26th, 2011

Scott Hiebert, Ph.D., associate director of Basic Research at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, has received a grant from the Samuel Waxman Cancer Research Foundation (SWCRF) to study genetic mutations related to B-cell lymphoma. The grant will help launch Hiebert’s research into the cascade of mutations that lead to B-cell lymphoma. The Max Cure Foundation has agreed […]

VICC Investigator Lands Lung Cancer Grants

Thursday, August 11th, 2011

  David Carbone, M.D., Ph.D., professor of Medicine, Cell and Developmental Biology and Cancer Biology, and colleagues from two University of Texas medical centers have been awarded research grants from the LUNGevity Foundation to develop better predictive biomarkers and treatment protocols for non-small cell lung cancer patients. Carbone, who leads the Specialized Program of Research […]

Folate May Lower Breast Cancer Risk

Friday, August 5th, 2011

A new study by investigators from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and the Shanghai Cancer Institute indicates that women who get adequate amounts of folate in their diet have a reduced risk of developing breast cancer, although the benefit appears linked to a woman’s menopausal status. The study found that women who had not yet reached menopause […]